Linux... anyone?

This is a WIP... and very opinionated, don't read too much into it. Use at your own peril...

I have tried many many distros, but I always came back to Ubuntu, until I found Linux Mint. I seem to be an Xfce fan... Linux Mint's release of it anyway.

My curent install...

human@listed:~$ cat /etc/*release
DISTRIB_ID=LinuxMint
DISTRIB_RELEASE=20
DISTRIB_CODENAME=ulyana
DISTRIB_DESCRIPTION="Linux Mint 20 Ulyana"
NAME="Linux Mint"
VERSION="20 (Ulyana)"
ID=linuxmint
ID_LIKE=ubuntu
PRETTY_NAME="Linux Mint 20"
VERSION_ID="20"
HOME_URL="https://www.linuxmint.com/"
SUPPORT_URL="https://forums.ubuntu.com/"
BUG_REPORT_URL="http://linuxmint-troubleshooting-guide.readthedocs.io/en/latest/"
PRIVACY_POLICY_URL="https://www.linuxmint.com/"
VERSION_CODENAME=ulyana
UBUNTU_CODENAME=focal

My cheesy aliases...

I get a lot of grief for the dist-upgrade trigger... there is nothing on my machine soooo critical that a catastrophic failure would scare me. I'd just build another machine/drive... I learned the art of backup in 1999 well before the advent of Timeshift.

human@listed:~$ cat ~/.bash_aliases
alias ll='ls -lahF --color=auto'
alias pw='pwgen -ysB1 16'
alias cls='clear'
alias update='sudo apt-get update && sudo apt-get upgrade && sudo apt-get dist-upgrade'
alias vpn='sudo protonvpn'

Some kool utilities...

pwgen generates passwords which are designed to be easily memorized by humans, while being as secure as possible.

Unless you use a few flags...

human@listed:~$ pwgen -ysB1 16
H(?E<xL<7`Ew&oyz

free displays the total amount of free and used physical and swap memory in the system, as well as the buffers and caches used by the kernel.

human@listed:~$ free -ht --si
              total        used        free      shared  buff/cache   available
Mem:            31G        7.1G        4.9G        1.6G         19G         22G
Swap:          975M          0B        975M
Total:          32G        7.1G        5.9G

bashtop is a resource monitor that shows usage and stats for processor, memory, disks, network and processes.

I ❤️ BashTOP... I run it constantly to help monitor my Tor bridge.

human@listed:~$ sudo bashtop

iftop listens to network traffic on a named interface, or on the first interface it can find which looks like an external interface if none is specified, and displays a table of current bandwidth usage by pairs of hosts.

Also run to monitor my bridge...

human@listed:~$ sudo iftop

Speaking of my Tor bridge, the one other monitor thing I do is using tail. It's a bit lame but does what I need it to do.

human@listed:~$ tail --follow=name /var/log/syslog | grep "Tor\["
Sep 11 07:34:28 bridge-name Tor[846]: Performing bandwidth self-test...done.
Sep 11 13:33:20 bridge-name Tor[846]: Heartbeat: Tor's uptime is 5:59 hours, with 24 circuits open. I've sent 1.96 GB and received 1.99 GB.
Sep 11 13:33:20 bridge-name Tor[846]: Heartbeat: Accounting enabled. Sent: 6.26 GB, Received: 6.33 GB, Used: 6.34 GB / 32.00 GB, Rule: max. The current accounting interval ends on 2001-09-11 19:57:00, in 6:23 hours.

The simple things...

Kill process running node... say, port 3e3.

human@listed:~$ sudo kill -9 $(sudo lsof -t -i:3000)

MD5 file check, both files in same directory.

human@listed:~$ ls -1
dojo-release-1.16.3.tar.gz
dojo-release-1.16.3.tar.gz.md5

human@listed:~$ md5sum -c dojo-release-1.16.3.tar.gz.md5
dojo-release-1.16.3.tar.gz: OK

Using linux and node.js with express.js, and you get the ill fated System limit for number of file watchers reached, watch [some file] error... this worked for me.

echo fs.inotify.max_user_watches=666666 | sudo tee -a /etc/sysctl.conf && sudo sysctl -p

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